Stockton-Delta Amateur Radio Club

W6SF CLUB MEETING IS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12TH ON ZOOM...

JIM TIEMSTRA
ARRL PACIFIC DIVISION DIRECTOR 
SILENT KEY 
ARRL Pacific Division Director Jim Tiemstra, K6JAT, of Oakland,
California, died October 30. An ARRL Life Member, he was 65.

"Jim was passionate about ham radio and a dedicated member of the
ARRL Board of Directors," ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, said. "He devoted himself to the members of his Division and always strove to do what was best for amateur radio and its future. His knowledge and leadership were significant and will be missed by the many who worked with him and had the pleasure to know him."

Tiemstra was ARRL Pacific Division Vice Director from 2009 through
2017, sitting on the Administration and Finance, and Programs and
Services Committees of the Board. He became ARRL Pacific Division
Director in January 2018. Currently, he was a member of the
Administration and Finance Committee, the Legal Structure Review
Committee, chair of the Legislative Advocacy Committee, and an
advisor to the Amateur Radio Legal Defense and Assistance Committee, among other Board assignments.

Licensed in 1970 as WN9ELU in Chicago, Tiemstra was the president of his high school radio club in Illinois. Early on, he built most of his own gear from Heathkits. In 1977, he married Lilah Greene,
KE6EHD, and they moved to California, where Tiemstra became N6OIK,
later choosing K6JAT as a vanity call sign. He'd also held V26JAT
and 3D2TJ and had operated from Curacao and Hawaii.

Primarily a contester and DXer, Tiemstra had been a DXpedition
member and had long been involved in the public service aspects of
the hobby. As a member of the Oakland Amateur Radio Emergency
Service (ARES) group, he was among those responding to the Loma
Prieta earthquake in 1989 and the Oakland Hills firestorm in 1991,
receiving a Certificate of Appreciation from the American Red Cross. He championed the Emergency Communication Ham Operation (ECHO) proposal to install amateur radio equipment in his city's emergency operations center and in each of its 30 fire stations.

Tiemstra worked with his ARES group to gain RACES recognition, wrote the RACES Operations Manual, and was instrumental in forging a formal Letter of Understanding with the City of Oakland. Jim served as Oakland's RACES Radio Officer for more than 14 years, was on the mayor's Emergency Management Council, and was ARRL East Bay Section Emergency Coordinator. In 2002, he was recognized by the Oakland Fire Department as Community Volunteer of the Year.

In 1998, Tiemstra incorporated the Oakland Radio Communication
Association (ORCA), an ARRL affiliated club, was a founding
director, and became its first president. He served as trustee of
the club's call sign, WW6OR. 

Tiemstra retired in 2018 as a federal practitioner in the private
practice of law. He was an ARRL Diamond Club and Maxim Society
member.

He and his wife have twin sons, Robert and Matthew, KI6IHP.
NNNN
/EX
SPECIAL EVENT STATION K9M 
FOR MOOSEHART FOUNDER'S DAY
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7TH 16:00 - 23:00 UTC


The Mooseheart Founder’s Day special event will take place on Saturday November 7th . The Fox River Radio League will operate a special event station in celebration.  
On the Air Event hours will be from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM PST. The call sign will be K9M and a dedicated website has been set up at: http://foundersdayk9m.com/ 

The On the Air event will be looking for Moose Lodge Member hams and no-member hams as well.  Questions about Moose Charities and Moose International can be asked by visiting the website. 

A specials event QSL Card will be available for all who want them. 

ARRL NOVEMBER SWEEPSTAKES CONTEST 

NOV 7- 9 FOR CW

NOV 21-23 FOR PHONE


Contest Objective: To support amateur self-training in radiocommunications, including improving amateur operating skills, conducting technical investigations, and intercommunicating with other amateurs. Stations in the United States and Canada (including territories and possessions) exchange information with as many other US and Canadian stations as possible on the 160, 80, 40, 20, 15 and 10 meter bands.

Dates:   CW: First full weekend in November (November 7-9, 2020).

              Phone: Third full weekend in November (November 21-23, 2020).

                   Begins 2100 UTC Saturday and runs through 0259 UTC Monday.


2020 Update:

There are now a total of 84 ARRL/RAC sections, as RAC has separated Prince Edward Island (PE) from the Maritime (MAR) Section. Make sure your contest logging software and "country" (CTY) files have been updated so that those abbreviations are recognized and credited properly. 

For contest information contact contests@arrl.org or (860) 594-0232



Contest Exchange: Send the following six pieces of information during each contact: the sequential serial number of the contact, your precedence (type of entry – A, B, Q, M, S, or U), your call sign, your check (the last two digits of the year the operator or station was first licensed), and the abbreviation for your ARRL or RAC section. It is recommended that the information be sent in this order to avoid confusion.

You must include your call sign as part of the exchange. 

The following is a typical Sweepstakes contact:

    CQing Station: CQ Sweepstakes from W9JJ
    Answering Station: W1AW
    CQer: W1AW 123 A W9JJ 79 CT
    Ans: 43 M W1AW 31 CT
    CQer: Thanks, CQ Sweepstakes from W9JJ

As the answering station, it is not necessary to send the CQing station's call before the exchange unless you think there might be some confusion about what station you are responding to.

Operating Time

All stations may operate no more than 24 of the 30 hours.  Scores will be calculated from contacts logged during the first 24 hours of operation.

This rule limits operating time (listening or transmitting) to 24 hours. Contacts logged after 24 hours of operation will not be counted toward the final score, but there is no penalty for including those contacts in a submitted log, and the station contacted is eligible to receive credit for the contact.

Off-times must consist of a minimum of 30 consecutive minutes without operating. Listening time counts as operating time

FOR MORE INFO VISIT http://www.arrl.org/sweepstakes

NOVEMBER MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12TH
Meeting starts at 7:00 PM

ELECTION NIGHT

VIRTUAL MEETING 
USING ZOOM VIDEO CONFERENCING
DO NOT GO TO THE SAILING CLUB MEETING ROOM… THERE WILL BE NO ONE THERE

QST QST QST… The November meeting of the Stockton-Delta Amateur Radio Club will be held on Thursday, November 12th starting at 19:00 hours. The meeting will be VIRTUAL – ON-LINE using Zoom Video Conferencing as our platform.  Our meeting space at the Stockton sailing club is undergoing renovation. 


I have copied the invitation here, but you can join via the webmail link that will be on the W6SF website.

 

THIS MEETING IS ELECTION NIGHT.  CLUB MEMBERS WISHING TO NOMINATE OTHERS FOR BOARD POSITIONS CAN DO SO UP TO THE MEETING VOTE CALL. EMAIL YOUR NOMINATIONS TO BOARD@W6SF.ORG   


Our presentation will be a video on Pico Ballooning by Brian Basura, N6CVO.  This is a really fascinating part of Amateur Radio combining Ballooning, APRS, Meteorology and Amateur Radio.

 

Topic: W6SF SDARC MONTHLY CLUB MEETING – PROGRAM TBD

 

Time: November 12, 2020 07:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

       

Join Zoom Meeting

 

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84385771704

 

Meeting ID: 843 8577 1704

One tap mobile

+16699009128,,84385771704# US (San Jose)

SDARC HOSTS W-6-Q SPECIAL EVENT CALL FOR CAL QSO PARTY 2020

The Stockton-Delta Amateur Radio Club was honored with the Special Event Callsign W6Q as part of the 2020 Cal QSO Party celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Northern California Contest Club.  We were one of only 21 stations across the state needing to be worked to spell the word
S-E-Q-U-O-I-A to qualify for the SEQUOIA challenge.  You can read about the challenge on the Cal QSO Party website - HERE

Starting the week prior, we put up the club HexBeam and additional antennas for 40M and 80M so we could run simultaneous stations on both Phone and CW during the contest.  We set up 4 stations for phone and 3 stations for CW.  Sadly there was no activity heard on 10M but we did make contacts on all bands 15 - 80 Meters. The "night shift" especially had fun on 40M and 80M - even 11 yr old Shane was making contacts on 80 Meters like a seasoned pro contester.  

We logged 1056 QSOs for a combined score of over 150,000 points. We missed a “clean sweep” of all 58 multipliers by just two MB and NT – those darn Canadians were hiding! For a completely unassisted operation (no spotters or internet alerts) with current band conditions that is a solid win! Pictures are worth 1000 words and thanks to Dave N6LHL for these pictures of the event. 

FCC PROPOSES $50 LICENSE FEE FOR AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE
COMMENT WINDOW CLOSES NOV 16TH 

Amateur radio licensees would pay a $50 fee for each amateur radio license application if the FCC adopts rules it proposed this week. Included in the FCC’s fee proposal are applications for new licenses, renewal and upgrades to existing licenses, and vanity call sign requests. 

The FCC proposal is contained in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in MD Docket 20-270, which was adopted to implement portions of the “Repack Airwaves Yielding Better Access for Users of Modern Services Act” of 2018 — the so-called “Ray Baum’s Act.”

The Act requires that the FCC switch from a Congressional-mandated fee structure to a cost-based system of assessment. In its NPRM, the FCC proposed application fees for a broad range of services that use the FCC’s Universal Licensing System (ULS), including the Amateur Radio Service that had been excluded by an earlier statute. The 2018 statute excludes the Amateur Service from annual regulatory fees, but not from application fees. Applications for personal licenses are mostly automated and do not have individualized staff costs for data input or review,” the FCC said in its NPRM. “For these automated processes — new/major modifications, renewal, and minor modifications..." The same $50 fee would apply to all Amateur Service applications, including those for vanity call signs. “Although there is currently no fee for vanity call signs in the Amateur Radio Service, we find that such applications impose similar costs in aggregate on Commission resources as new applications and therefore propose a $50 fee,” the FCC said.

The FCC also proposes to assess a $50 fee for individuals who want a printed copy of their license. “The Commission has proposed to eliminate these services — but to the extent the Commission does not do so, we propose a fee of $50 to cover the costs of these services,” the FCC said.

The Ray Baum’s Act does not exempt filing fees in the Amateur Radio Service. The FCC dropped assessment of fees for vanity call signs several years ago.

Comments are being accepted on the NPRM in MD Docket 20-270, which proposes application fees for radio amateurs.  The is already open on the FCC's Electronic Comment Filing System located at https://www.fcc.gov/ecfs/filings  , and posting to MD Docket No. 20-270.  You can also click on the FCC logo to be connected to the ECFS page of the FCC website.  

Formal deadlines for comments HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED.  The comment window will close on November 16th, 2020.   

Here are some points that can be used when preparing your written comments opposing the proposal:

Public Service--
Amateurs contribute to the public good. Amateurs are able to provide emergency communications backup at zero cost to the taxpayer.

A Voluntary, Non-Commercial, National Resource--
Unlike operators in other FCC services, Amateurs must not use their license for any pecuniary interest and are prohibited from earning or charging any money for any communications activity.

Technology--
Amateur radio is a source of signifcant technological innovation that should be encouraged, not discouraged.

Youth and Education (STEM)--
The United States is experiencing a severe lack of RF engineers and the US falls behind many countries in science, technology, engineering and math expertise. Amateur radio is helping to meet the deficit, but much more is needed.

Undue Burden on Youth and Elderly--
Retirees and youngsters (High School and College-aged) are least able to afford licensing fees. RF knowledge and related digital expertise is needed to maintain US leadership in wireless industries. At a minimum, young people (below the age of 26) and those who rely solely on SS income, should be exempt from the proposed license fees.

Self-Regulating--
Amateur radio is self-regulating: (a) We test ourselves (b) We regulate our own behavior

Covid-19 Crisis--
An extra fee of any amount for a non-pecuniary, non-remunerative amateur license, at the present time, is an ill advised proposal, particularly when congress and the executive branch have already distributed one stimulus check, and are currently struggling to distribute a second stimulus check for citizens who are having difficulty ends meet, in many, if not most areas of the country.

Additional Suggestions :

• Focus on the positive aspects and value that the Amateur Radio Service offers our nation.
• Avoid arguing that the fee will “kill” amateur radio.
• Make arguments on why the fees would impair the public benefts of the Amateur Radio Service.
• Avoid ham jargon (QSO, worked, contesting, ticket, bird-watts, QRM) in your comments, which will not be understood by FCC personnel.

Remember: The fee proposals cover every FCC license and service across the board and the fee collection was directed by Congress, however, FCC can waive fees for good cause. Also remember, the money from fees will go to the general treasury, not to the FCC for more enforcement, printing licenses, better salaries, better equipment, training, or making them competent at what they purport to do, etc. It all goes to the general fund -- not to the FCC.

 

STOCKTON-DELTA AMATEUR RADIO CLUB
OCTOBER 8TH MEETING REPORT 


The October meeting of the Stockton-Delta Amateur Radio Club was held on Thursday, October 8th starting at 19:05 hours. The meeting was called to order by President Bob, N6TCE.  There was no Treasurers report available. 

Old Business
Bob N6TCE reported that a second order of T-Shirts were in. Contact Dave N6LHL  if you want to get a shirt.  Shirts are blue with the club logo in white on the front. Costs range from $15.00 - $24.00 depending on size. 
The Great American Shake Out Earthquake Drill on Thursday 10/15 was discussed.  Check out details on the home page of this website.  

John NZ6QA reported on CQP. Thank you to Charlie WB6NVB for the use of the vineyard.  The antennas and radios performed very well on all bands. 

New Business
Bob N6TCE opened the floor to nominations for the 2021 Board of Directors.  Ron KG7OR nominated the slate of existing officers for a 2nd term.  (Second by Mark W6SXA).  Nominations will remain open until the beginning of the November meeting.  Anyone wishing to nominate a member as a club officer can do so via email to board@w6sf.org


The business meeting was adjourned at 19:25 hours and John NZ6Q introduced our speaker Todd KL4EL 


Todd related a great story of his experiences as an EC involved with EMCOMM in Sitka, AK.  Afterwards,  there was a lively discussion on local experiences with ARES and EMCOMM and it was pretty clear that locally there is room for better communication.  


There were 24 members and guests attending the Zoom Conference meeting. 

You can listen to the meeting again via Zoom recording here. 


Meeting Recording:

https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/XS3uoJt3srWj40DiJNgHm5yQ-ZfT8oGcMtcsoOAmAX9SOKwXD0G6FwqP6D3V8g0.g0x5J6-jW7-AlodU

 

Access Passcode: w6sf!147165


Topic: W6SF SDARC MEETING FOR SEPTEMBER 2020 - CONVERSATION W/A CONTESTER
Start Time : Sep 10, 2020 06:34 PM

Meeting Recording:
https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/XS3uoJt3srWj40DiJNgHm5yQ-ZfT8oGcMtcsoOAmAX9SOKwXD0G6FwqP6D3V8g0.g0x5J6-jW7-AlodU

Access Passcode: w6sf!147165

73,

Annie, N6ACL

W6SF FIELD DAY REPORT 

JUNE 27TH & 28TH 

Field Day 2020 was like no other.... 


W6SF club members gathered early Saturday Morning for the start of this year’s Field Day. Antenna preparations began soon after daybreak with Charlie WB6NVB, Dave N6LHL, Paul N6XZW, Erin KM6LDD, Dave KN6IWI, Scott K6NEZ and others setting up the 2nd tower for the 40/80 Meter Dipole antenna and the 6 Meter Vertical. Originally we had planned on erecting the club Hexbeam on top of the same tower but we had a last minute problem locating a box containing the spreaders so the Hexbeam was replaced by the MFJ all band 80 – 6 meter vertical.

Check out the full report with pictures in this month's July 2020 W6SF Newsletter "The Flysheet".  You can download a copy by clicking on this link here


This was a great Field Day with lots of fun and visitors.  

ARLB028 FCC Orders Amateur Access to 3.5 GHz Band to "Sunset"

Despite vigorous and continuing opposition from ARRL and others, the FCC has ordered the "sunsetting" of the 3.3 - 3.5-GHz amateur radio secondary spectrum allocation. The decision allows current amateur activity on the band to continue, "grandfathering" the amateur operations subject to a later decision.

The FCC proposed two 
deadlines for amateur operations to cease on the band. The first would apply to the 3.4 - 3.5 GHz segment, the second to 3.3 - 3.4 GHz. The FCC will establish the dates once it reviews additional comments.

"We adopt our proposal from the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to
remove the amateur allocation from the 3.3 - 3.5 GHz band," the FCC said in its R&O. "[W]e adopt changes to our rules today that provide for the sunset of the secondary amateur allocation in the band, but allow continued use of the band for amateur operations, pending resolution of the issues raised in the Further Notice."

The Report and Order (R&O) and Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in WT Docket No. 19-348 adopted on September 30 followed a 2019 FCC Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in which the FCC proposed re-allocating 3.45 - 3.55 GHz for "flexible-use service" and auctioning the desirable "mid-band" spectrum (generally defined as between 1 GHz and 6 GHz) to 5G providers. These and other recent spectrum-repurposing actions stem from the MOBILE NOW Act, enacted in 2018, in which Congress directed the Commission to make additional spectrum available to auction for mobile and fixed wireless broadband. The FCC action is consistent with worldwide allocations adopted by the ITU for these frequencies.

The Report and Order can be found online in PDF format at,
https://ecfsapi.fcc.gov/file/1002214202488/FCC-20-138A1.pdf .

In the run-up to the Commission's decision, ARRL met with the FCC's professional staff to explain its concerns and to answer questions. Subsequently, ARRL met with the wireless advisors to the FCC Chairman and two Commissioners. In those meetings, ARRL reiterated that continued secondary status for amateurs will not impair or devalue use of this spectrum by the primary licensees intending to provide 5G or other service. ARRL noted amateur radio's long history of successful coexistence with primary users of the 9 cm band, sharing this spectrum with the federal government users and secondary, non-federal occupants.

ARRL pointed out that vital links in amateur television and amateur radio high-speed mesh networks using the band have been especially valuable during such emergency situations as the wildfires currently raging on the west coast. Deleting the amateur secondary allocation will result in lost opportunities for experimentation and public service with no public interest benefit to make up for that.

ARRL argued that deleting the secondary allocation would waste the
scarce spectrum resource, particularly in areas where commercial
services often do not construct full facilities due to small
populations. The FCC action means that amateur radio will lose
access to the 3.5-GHz secondary allocation even where commercial
operations do not exist. ARRL told the Commission that it should not intentionally allow this spectrum to be vacant and unused, wasting the public resource, when amateurs can use some portion of it in many geographic areas with no detriment to any other licensee, just as it has in the past. ARRL argues that amateur operations should be permitted until and unless an actual potential for interference exists.

Deletion of the 3.3 - 3.5 GHz secondary amateur allocation will
become effective on the effective date of the FCC's order, but
amateur radio operation as of that date may continue while the FCC
finalizes rules to license spectrum in the 3.45 - 3.55 GHz band and establishes deadlines for amateur operations to cease. The FCC
proposed allowing amateur operation in the 3.3 - 3.4 GHz portion of the band to continue "pending further decisions about the future of this portion of the spectrum," the timing for which is unknown. The Commission proposed to mandate that operations cease in the 3.4 - 3.5 GHz portion when commercial licensing commences for the new 3.45 - 3.55 GHz "5G" band, which is predicted to begin in the first half of 2022.

"[W]e seek comment on whether it is in the public interest to sunset amateur use in the 3.3 - 3.55 GHz band in two separate phases, e.g., first above 3.4 GHz, which is the focus of [the R&O] and later in that portion of the band below 3.4 GHz," the FCC said.

ARRL expressed gratitude to the many members and organizations that joined ARRL in challenging the FCC throughout this nearly year-long proceeding. They included multiple radio clubs, weak signal enthusiasts, moonbounce participants, and the Amateur Radio
Emergency Data Network (AREDN), the Amateur Television Network
(ATN), AMSAT, and Open Research Institute (ORI).

ARRL will continue its efforts to preserve secondary amateur radio
access to 3.3 - 3.5 GHz. Members are invited to share comments by
visiting http://www.arrl.org/3-GHz-Band .

"We recognize that any loss of our privileges will most directly
impact radio amateurs who use the frequencies to operate and
innovate," said ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR. "Such instances only embolden ARRL's role to protect and advocate for the Amateur Radio Service and Amateur Satellite Service. There will be continued threats to our spectrum. So I urge all amateurs, now more than ever, to strengthen our hold by being ceaseless in our public service, experimenting, and discovery throughout the radio spectrum."

NNNN
2020 CLUB DUES ARE NOW DUE AND PAYABLE
DUES ARE STILL JUST $20 IN 2020!

The 2020 Board reviewed the current dues schedule and determined that if the club maintained their current membership level and continued to grow, there should be no reason to raise the dues in 2020. 

SDARC Dues are just $20 for a single membership, and $30 for a family membership - when the family lives under the same roof.  Click on the PayPal icon, and pay at that point with your credit or debit card.

Joining SDARC is a great value and a great investment in your hobby. We are looking forward to a great year of learning, supporting events and just plain hanging out and having fun.  Your $20 or $30 dollars help support these activites, help new hams get started, and help keep our repeaters on the air and getting better. 

You can also send a check for dues to:

Stockton-Delta A.R.C.
P.O. Box 690271
Stockton, CA 95269-0271


  HAM UNIVERSITY - "HAM-U"
NEW HAM - EXPERIENCED HAM 
TRAINING CLASS


HAM U HAS BEEN CANCELLED IN SEPTEMBER BECAUSE OF COVID-19

JOIN US AGAIN IN MARCH 2021


Ham-U has been cancelled for 2020.     We had a schedule conflict with the March date and have rescheduled to May 16th - then to September.  Now, with the city facilities shut down a second time because of the Coronavirus Shelter-in-Place, we have decided to start over in 2021. 

This is a FREE program that every ham – from beginner to Extra Class can benefit.  

The term "Elmer" means someone who provides personal guidance and assistance to would-be hams. The term first appeared in QST in a March 1971 "How's DX" column by Rod Newkirk, W9BRD (now also VA3ZBB). Newkirk called them "the unsung fathers of Amateur Radio."

Stockton-Delta Amateur Radio Club, the Manteca Amateur Radio Club and the Lodi Amateur Radio Club have come together to help teach new hams how to get started and offer this "personal guidance". 

These sessions are an opportunity for the new ham to learn and discover some of the many opportunities there are in Amateur Radio to "find your world" and give any ham just the chance to ask questions and get on the air. 

The class is structured with three 50 minute "classroom" sessions in the morning; lunch for an hour with "mini presentations", then two 50-minute break-out sessions in the afternoon. Classroom sessions include: Setting up and operating an HF station, Introduction to CW - Morse Code, digital modes - FT8, DMR, Picking your Radio Club, Programming and using your programmable radios, Anderson Power poles, building simple antennas, Radiosport (contesting & chasing DX), Satellites and an opportunity to ask questions of experienced ham operators in an open forum.    

SIGN UP FOR ELMERING SESSIONS HERE

THEY ARE FREE 

STOCKTON FIRE STATION #2
TRAINING DIVISION CLASSROOM
110 W SONORA ST
STOCKTON, CA 95202
(CORNER OF W SONORA ST/COMMERCE ST)

STARTING AT 8:00 AM

Look for HamU to be back on a Saturday

in March 2021

 


THANKS DAVE NAVONE FOR THE LINK TO THIS COOL VIDEO ALL ABOUT HAM RADIO AND THE TV SHOW "LAST MAN STANDING"
W6SF
2019 FIELD DAY VIDEO
CHECK IT OUT!
THANK YOU DENNIS AD6DM

Ham Test Online
CHECK OUT THE NEW CLUB HISTORY PAGE

CHECK OUT OUR OWN BOB KM6ONS AND KYLE K6KDD ON GOOD DAY SACRAMENTO

AUGUST 28, 2018

Click to Replace
QSO TODAY
CLUB REPEATERS

Located in the Sierra Nevada Mountains at 2500 feet, the club repeaters cover the Southern Sacramento and Northern San Joaquin Valleys. The call-sign is W6SF and can be heard on 147.165 MHz and on 442.250 MHz with a PL of 107.2 Hz. Club simplex frequency is 147.51 MHz.



SDARC also has a UHF repeater, operating independently, on 444.575+ PL 107.2.  This is a local low level Stockton repeater with the call W6SF.  As the project progresses, three receiver/voters will be installed via T1 phone lines and the addition of IRLP linking to other repeaters.  
CLUB REPEATERS

Located in the Sierra Nevada Mountains at 2500 feet, the club repeaters cover the Southern Sacramento and Northern San Joaquin Valleys. The call-sign is W6SF and can be heard on 147.165 MHz and on 442.250 MHz with a PL of 107.2 Hz. Club simplex frequency is 147.51 MHz.



SDARC also has a UHF repeater, operating independently, on 444.575+ PL 107.2.  This is a local low level Stockton repeater with the call W6SF.  As the project progresses, three receiver/voters will be installed via T1 phone lines and the addition of IRLP linking to other repeaters. 
CLUB REPEATERS

Located in the Sierra Nevada Mountains at 2500 feet, the club repeaters cover the Southern Sacramento and Northern San Joaquin Valleys. The call-sign is W6SF and can be heard on 147.165 MHz and on 442.250 MHz with a PL of 107.2 Hz. Club simplex frequency is 147.51 MHz.



SDARC also has a UHF repeater, operating independently, on 444.575+ PL 107.2.  This is a local low level Stockton repeater with the call W6SF.  As the project progresses, three receiver/voters will be installed via T1 phone lines and the addition of IRLP linking to other repeaters.  
CLUB REPEATERS

Located in the Sierra Nevada Mountains at 2500 feet, the club repeaters cover the Southern Sacramento and Northern San Joaquin Valleys. The call-sign is W6SF and can be heard on 147.165 MHz and on 442.250 MHz with a PL of 107.2 Hz. Club simplex frequency is 147.51 MHz.

  



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